Affordable Legal Services of Thomas Sandifer
Free Consultations 314-492-6955
Affordable Legal Services of Thomas Sandifer
Free Consultations
Call Today: 314-492-6955
Call Today: 314-492-6955

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How will your children go between homes after your divorce?

| Apr 14, 2021 | Family Law |

Your children will feel the effects of your divorce, even if you and the other parent agree to be amicable and work together. One of your main goals is to ensure they do not experience any undue effects, such as mental or emotional trauma, that could arise during this process. One of the ways you can protect their interests is to have a thoughtful and thorough custody and visitation plan in place.

As part of your custody plan, you may consider including details regarding how you and the other parent will get the children between your two Missouri homes. Going between residences can cause some upheaval, and this can be stressful. By outlining how you want these transitions to work, you may be able to help them feel comforted and secure, even during the immediate aftermath of your divorce.

Helping your children

Your divorce will be difficult for you as well as your kids, but you will have to provide them with emotional support during this time. As you work to establish a routine and adjust to your post-divorce life, the following could be helpful for you and your kids:

  • Communicate clearly with the other parent about your plans for transitioning the kids between the two homes. Establish a routine and stick to it.
  • Prepare your kids before they leave your home. Don’t rush them and don’t add stress as they mentally prepare to leave.
  • Talk to your kids about what they need and how you can specifically help them during this time.
  • Keep certain things at each house, but allow them to transport important objects, such as beloved stuffed animal, back and forth.
  • Have a goodbye ritual as you get ready to take the kids to the other parent, and allow them to decide how they want to communicate with you while they are away.
  • Resolve to be calm and stay calm during the entire transition process, even if you are not feeling that way at the moment.

When your goal is to protect the kids’ best interests above all else, you will find it easier to work calmly and peacefully with the other parent. This is not an easy time for any member of your family, but considering how you transition between homes can reduce the chance of disputes and additional stress.