Spring break is the first chance Midwesterners have to take in the warmer weather. According to the Transportation Security Administration, as many as 65 million people travel for the spring break season. If you plan on jet-setting for vacation or work there are some things you need to know should you find yourself in trouble. If a person gets arrested on vacation in another state and gets released, once they go home, they think it is the end of the story. Unfortunately, out of sight does not mean out of mind. 

Trips should not include a stay at the local jail

The state in which the alleged crime occurred will be the state which holds the jurisdiction to prosecute the offense.  For example, if you live in Missouri and you are arrested in Florida, the state of Florida, therefore, has the right to prosecute you for the offense. The most common charges out of state residents face are driving while intoxicated and disturbing the peace.

The area of authority matters

If you are convicted of a crime outside of your home state, in most circumstances the charges become part of public record. Your out of state conviction can follow you. Hiring a local lawyer may be your best bet in avoiding having to return to the state where you allegedly committed your crime. When looking to retain legal counsel, choose a professional that works in the jurisdiction where the charges are being brought. Many courts allow an attorney to appear on behalf of a defendant for almost all proceedings.

Playing tourist in another state should be a fun and ideally problem-less time. If you find yourself getting breakfast in bed at the local lockup instead of your hotel, it might be time to consider becoming a homebody.